in

What To Know Before Starting a Boat Restoration Project

What To Know Before Starting a Boat Restoration Project

This post contains affiliate links. Affiliate disclosure: As an Amazon Associate, we may earn commissions from qualifying purchases from Amazon.com and other Amazon websites.

As the season races towards longer days and nicer weather, many people turn their thoughts towards aquatic adventures. One common hobby with a massive following around the world is boating. Whether you’re a freshwater fisherman, a party boater, or just love cruising, there’s nothing like being out on the water in your craft.

Sadly, new boats can cost as much as a car or house, making this sport seem inaccessible to the average person. However, for every shiny new boat, there are at least a dozen just-as-good crafts available at significantly cheaper prices. The only catch is that they have to be repaired. Before you run out and grab your diamond in the rough, let’s explore what to know before starting a boat restoration project.

Do Your Research

Unsurprisingly, what to know before starting a boat restoration project includes practical information about the craft you’ll be restoring. Take the time to learn about the make and model you own or are looking into buying. If you haven’t bought your boat yet, make sure to investigate details such as the material type. For instance, fiberglass boats tend to be less expensive than aluminum, but are more difficult to repair if they incur major damage.

Investigate common problems your boat has and watch a few vlogs of people working on them. Time spent learning about your craft will reveal several reliable sites and individuals whose content you find relatable and helpful. Depending on how rough the condition of your boat is, chances are you’ll be repeatedly returning to your favorite information providers as you troubleshoot down the line.

Plan for a Mess Before You Start

Fixing up a boat is messy—very messy. Depending on just how dedicated to the project you are, a complete strip-down might be on the docket. Needless to say, having done a complete rebuilding will grant a mastery of your craft that’s well worth having on the open water. Since boats spend so much time getting wet, old ones often suffer from deep-seated rot due to standing water after seasons of normal use and mixed weather conditions.

Chances are that you may need to cut a new deck and restore a few sections of buoyancy foam, which of course includes removing and dismantling the old. Figure out ahead of time where the waste will end up. Many first-timers opt for a mini dumpster as a quick and cheap way to shed unwanted and rotten material.

Prepare a Workspace

One does not simply begin to dismantle a boat. Casually starting on such a project will without fail result in components and boat attachments strewn all over your home. Once you start working on one problem, you’ll begin to notice dozens of others. Try to stick to one issue at a time and keep just what you need around you in an organized space.

Furthermore, plan for quite a bit of space. Many used boats, especially affordably priced ones, suffer from maladies like rotten decks, mouse-chewed wires, and a significant buildup of grime. You’ll want a space where you can dismantle large sections of wood, handle power tools, and clean up easily.

How To Avoid Getting Ripped off by a Mechanic

How To Avoid Getting Ripped off by a Mechanic

What To Look for in an Off-Road Truck

What To Look for in an Off-Road Truck